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BIOTRONIK SE & Co.KG
Woermannkehre 1
12359 Berlin
Deutschland
Tel. +49 (0) 30 68905 0
patients@biotronik.com

Treatment options for peripheral artery disease (PAD)

Renal artery

There are many ways renal artery disease can be treated.

Patients with only mild or moderate symptoms typically undergo medical therapy, which includes medication to control high blood pressure. Regular physical examinations (blood pressure and tests of kidney function) are important so that worsening symptoms can be treated if they occur.

For patients who continue to have symptoms despite optimal medication therapy, it may be necessary to physically open (revascularize) the restrictions in the renal arteries.

This can be done with surgery or through a catheter (angioplasty).

Because both surgery and angioplasty have associated risks, patients with renal artery disease require a revascularization procedure only when they have very high blood pressure or kidney failure.
 

Iliac artery

The aorta is the largest artery, carrying blood pumped out of your heart to the rest of the body. Just beneath the navel, the aorta splits into two iliac arteries that carry blood to the legs.

Patients with peripheral artery disease in the iliac arteries tend to experience cramping pain in the thigh, buttocks, back or hip while walking or at rest. Patients don’t always feel pain, however; it may be a tightness, heaviness or weakness in the legs. 

The physician will usually perform an ankle brachial index (ABI) that measures any difference between the blood pressure in the arm and the ankle. The ABI is a simple and sensitive diagnostic technique, although it cannot show exactly where the constriction or blockage is.

Color Doppler ultrasound is a noninvasive technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to show blood flow and problems with the structure of blood vessels. It gives good images of most arteries and the blood flowing through them. It can tell the physician where the arteries are narrow and where they are healthy.

With angiography, a liquid is injected into an artery, and pictures are taken with X-rays. Angiography shows the internal contours of the arteries, so it is possible to see where they are of a normal width and where they are narrow. If the artery is constricted to half its normal size (or less), it is usually opened with catheters immediately after the angiography.
 

Lower limb

An accurate diagnosis of peripheral artery disease in the lower limb includes a detailed history of the patient’s symptoms.

When legs do not get enough blood, it can cause pain or burning in the feet and toes. When this happens often, and at rest, it is called critical limb ischemia. In severe cases, painful sores that do not heal develop on the toes or feet.

The superficial femoral artery (SFA) is the longest artery in the body, and it is bent and twisted with every step we take. It is an area that attracts atherosclerotic deposits—fatty deposits on the vessel’s inner walls that can narrow the artery, limiting the amount of blood that can get to the thighs and calves. Patients with diseases in the superficial femoral artery typically complain of exercise-induced pain in the calf, called intermittent claudication (IC), which resolves itself after a few minutes of rest. Often patients do not experience pain, but a tightness, heaviness or weakness in the legs with activity.

The physician will usually perform an ankle brachial index (ABI), which measures any difference between the blood pressure in the arm and the ankle. The ABI is a simple and sensitive diagnostic technique, although it cannot show exactly where the constriction or blockage is.

Color Doppler ultrasound is a noninvasive technique that uses high-frequency sound waves that bounce off of blood cells and blood vessels to show blood flow and problems with the structure of blood vessels. It gives good images of most arteries and the blood flowing in them. It can tell the physician where the arteries are narrow and where they are healthy.

With angiography, a liquid is injected into an artery, and pictures are taken with X-rays. Angiography shows the internal contours of the arteries, so it is possible to see where they are of a normal width and where they are narrow. If the artery is constricted to half its normal size (or less), it is usually opened with catheters immediately after the angiography.

 

 

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